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Santa Fe in August

Santa Fe in August

From Aug 08 2019 to Aug 16 2019

One of the tribal art world’s longest- standing events, this year the Whitehawk annual Antique Indian & Ethnographic Art Show celebrates its forty-first continuous year of operation. Held at the Santa Fe Community Convention Center just a few blocks from the Plaza, the event features approximately 100 largely United States–based dealers representing fi elds as diverse as Native American and Pre-Columbian art to high-end Asian, Spanish colonial, and folk art. The event opens with a gala reception on the evening of August 9, 2019, and is open to the public regular hours August 10–12. This is a show that truly has something for everyone. Not far away at El Museo Cultural de Santa Fe, the annual Objects of Art show will be held the same weekend. This is a more broadly focused event than Whitehawk. While there is a strong presence of Native American and ethnographic art at this show, its intended emphasis is art and design, and other dealers include fi ne art, furniture, decorative arts, jewelry, and fashion. More than seventy dealers from the United States and abroad will bring their aesthetic perspectives to the event. The show commences with a cocktail reception on the evening of August 8, which benefits the Santa Fe Museum of International Folk Art, and is open regular hours August 9–11. Portions of the proceeds—those from canine-inspired artworks— will benefit Assistance Dogs of the West in Santa Fe.

Sous l’oeil de Malick Sidibé Et un chant contre le sida

Sous l’oeil de Malick Sidibé Et un chant contre le sida

From Jun 19 2019 to Jan 12 2020

Malick Sidibé (1935–2016), a famous Malian photographer, was granted the Hasselblad Award in 2003, among other prizes, and received a Golden Lion at the Venice Biennale in 2007. He is the first artist to earn these two prestigious distinctions. The Musée Barbier-Mueller is paying tribute to this photographer, whose body of work the visitor will first discover through a dozen unpublished portraits, taken within the framework of a competition featuring songs against AIDS, organized in Mali by Monique Barbier-Mueller in 2005. Better-known prints, displayed in the basement, bring the Mali of the 1960s–1970s back to life and bear witness to the kind, curious, and spirited gaze with which Malick Sidibé regarded his peers. The museum wishes to showcase Mali, while at the same time promoting its traditional arts. Extraordinary pieces, including pendants, ornaments and figurines, masks, seats, and statues belonging to the Soninke, Dogon, and Bamana peoples, to cite only a few, are thus exhibited on the mezzanine. Brought together in the museum for the first time, these works will show the artists’ admirable creativity, while opening a window on the many rites and beliefs they sustain. Photo : ©Malick Sidibé. Courtesy Galerie Magnin-A, Paris.

Legacy: Selections from the Gillett G. Griffin Collection

Legacy: Selections from the Gillett G. Griffin Collection

From Jul 20 2019 to Oct 06 2019

Legacy: Selections from the Gillett G. Griffin Collection celebrates the life and career of Gillett G. Griffin (1928–2016), highlighting a selection of artworks and artifacts from the thousands that he donated and bequeathed to the Princeton University Art Museum. Griffin was not only a respected curator, scholar, and collector but also a beloved teacher— and one of the most memorable figures in the history of the university and of the Princeton community. Among the fifty-five pieces in the exhibition are Greek, Roman, Egyptian, ancient Near Eastern, Islamic, African, Chinese, Japanese, and Pre-Columbian antiques and antiquities, as well as European and American prints, drawings, and sculptures, showing Griffin’s remarkable range of connoisseurship. A handful of paintings and drawings attest to Griffin’s own talents as an artist. The exhibition opens July 20, 2019, and will be on view through October 6, 2019.

Parcours des Mondes 2019

Parcours des Mondes 2019

From Sep 10 2019 to Sep 15 2019

The 18th edition of Parcours des Mondes, the World's most important international Tribal Art Event, by the virtue of the number, quality and diversity of it's participating dealers will be held from September 10 to 15. Over 60 internationally known dealers with specialties in the arts of Africa, Oceania, The Americas, Asia and Archeology will gather in the heart of the Saint-Germain-des-Prés neighborhood in Paris. This year, not 3 but 8 participants in the field of archeology will exhibit alongside the main galleries. Several galleries are presenting thematic exhibitions. Among them : "Wild Animals" by Galerie Dodier, "The Art of the Collection: Jan Calmeyn" by Galerie Bernard Dulon, "New Ireland" by Galerie Flak, or "Baulé" by Galerie Lucas Ratton. The historical Saint-Germain-des-Prés neighborhood becomes a veritable open-air museum for the duration of the fair, at which everyone from experienced collectors and professionals to the merely curious can discover exceptional artworks from all five continents. On the occasion of Parcours des Mondes, Tribal Art magazine will welcome you Rue Visconti, 4 with special discount on subscriptions. Parcours des Mondes is THE appointment of the year not to be missed!

Heroes and Spirits in Cannes

Heroes and Spirits in Cannes

From Jul 05 2019 to Oct 27 2019

CANNES—In collaboration with the city of Cannes, the Musée de la Castre is presenting Héros et esprits de Nouvelle-Guinée (Heroes and Spirits of New Guinea), an exhibition that features some forty photographs taken by insatiable adventuress Wylda Bayrón. Her series of portraits shows people from New Guinea wearing their elaborate costumes and extraordinary ornaments. A selection of traditional Melanesian objects is also on hand, complementing and enhancing the photos and providing context for the lively or even apocalyptic imagery by the New York–based photographer. Her work captures societies in transformation that persevere with their ancestral traditions while their traditional lifeways are under constant threat. The remarkable men and women her lens captures challenge the viewer, revealing aspects of these individuals without completely penetrating their mysterious universe. The exhibition is on view from July 5–October 27, 2019, and was produced under the supervision of Chris Boylan.

Remedies at Galerie Afrique

Remedies at Galerie Afrique

From Jul 04 2019 to Aug 31 2019

It’s not summer without an African art exhibition in Ramatuelle, and we have Galerie Afrique to thank for that. Every July, the gallery welcomes the many visitors to this beautiful medieval village on the French Riviera by staging a cultural event commensurate with the beauty of the place. This year, the subject is the art and medicine of West Africa. From July 1–August 31, 2019, the gallery will be filled with symbols of distress, masks with deformed features from the Pende of the Democratic Republic of the Congo for instance, as well as by “remedy objects” such as receptacles for medicinal substances from Tanzania, sculptures associated with the Vodun practices of West Africa, and healing figures from Ghana. While these objects come from many different regions and answer to a wide variety of needs, the gallery’s owners feel they share a commonality in their formal conception with the works of the masters of abstractionism and cubism in twentieth-century Western art.

Color Riot!

Color Riot!

From Jun 15 2019 to Sep 02 2019

PHOENIX—The individualism and fl air for experimentation of Navajo weavers are vividly expressed in textiles from the last quarter of the nineteenth century. These textiles are rooted in ideas and events that the weavers experienced between 1863 and 1868, the hard years of their imprisonment in the Bosque Redondo, and their subsequent return to a reservation. During this time, weavers saw examples of the design systems of Hispanic textiles and acquired new materials such as aniline dyes and Germantown yarns that touched off their experiments with color and design. Commercial products at trading posts sparked additional design ideas for weavers. This was a time when outside market influences were at a low point. The old indigenous trading networks had been disrupted, woven garments were being replaced with commercial cloth, and traders had not yet developed the design constraints dictated by the rug market that developed in the early 1900s. During this time of great change, as the Navajo rebuilt their flocks and repaired the devastation of Bosque Redondo, weavers had an unprecedented freedom to experiment. Today, Navajo textiles are viewed as art, and the visions of these weavers are being showcased in Color Riot! How Color Changed Navajo Textiles at the Heard Museum through September 29, 2019.

Striking Iron: The Art of African Blacksmiths

Striking Iron: The Art of African Blacksmiths

From Jun 06 2019 to Oct 20 2019

The Art of African Blacksmiths is an international traveling exhibition that combines scholarship with objects of great aesthetic beauty to create the most comprehensive treatment of the blacksmith’s art in Africa. The exhibition includes more than 225 artworks from across the African continent, focusing on the region south of the Sahara and covering a time period spanning early archaeological evidence to the present day. Borrowed from American and European public and private collections, it also features wood sculptures studded with iron, blades, and currencies in a myriad of shapes and sizes, diverse musical instruments, body adornments, an array of ritual accoutrements, tools and weapons, and other important objects that enabled Africans to forage and hunt, till the soil, and assure their own protection and prosperity. Currently presented at the Smithsonian Institution’s National Museum of African Art in Washington, D.C. it will then travel to the Musée du Quai Branly – Jacques Chirac in Paris. A feature about the show is available in the Summer Issue (T92) of Tribal Art magazine.

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