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SEATS: A selection of 50 seats from across Africa

SEATS: A selection of 50 seats from across Africa

From Jul 06 2017 to Jul 29 2017

The gallery owner and tribal art dealer Bryan Reeves presents in this beautiful exhibition a set of 50 seats collected from his journeys across Africa or from private collections in the United Kingdom and Europe. Long or large, royal or household, for children or elderly… these chairs illustrate the infinite variety and delicacy of African art and handicraft. To the delight of the collectors, the exhibits are also on sale. The exhibition takes place at "Tribal Gathering London" on Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday and Saturday, from 10:30 am to 5:30 pm and until July 29. To view a selection of 50 seats from the exhibition view the catalogue here: https://issuu.com/bryanreeves5/docs/seats2017_web

Summer exhibition in Montreal

Summer exhibition in Montreal

From Jun 15 2017 to Jul 29 2017

As has become customary, Galerie Jacques Germain marks the arrival of summer with an exhibition in his Montreal space. This show is a preview of the material that will appear in opus VIII of the Art Ancien de l’Afrique Noire series, the launch of which will be held in Paris in September at this year’s Parcours des Mondes. Sixteen major sculptures are presented to the Canadian public for viewing, as always with the hope that these outstanding and carefully selected works will arouse new interest. To keep the element of surprise alive, we will mention only two of these objects: an elegant Luba axe from the DRC and a mask from the Bondoukou region in Côte d’Ivoire. Possibly Ligbi, Dioula, or Djimini, the exact attribution of the latter remains uncertain, but it is unique for its polychrome red, white, and blue highlights.

The Antique Indian Art Show 2017

The Antique Indian Art Show 2017

From Aug 16 2017 to Aug 18 2017

This event will be held at El Museo Cultural in Santa Fe. It will open the evening of August 15 and run August 16–18. This corresponds to the annual Santa Fe Indian Market (August 19–20), a massive event that is largely focused on contemporary Native American arts and crafts. This show brings a significant element of pre-1950 Native American art into the mix. Santa Fe is the Southwest heartland of American Indian art and culture, and the show follows the city’s centuries-old tradition of trade in Native art. It reaches far beyond the Southwestern pueblos and tribes to represent the cultural and geographical diversity of indigenous peoples throughout the U.S. and Canada. From the Navajo Nation to the Great Plains to the Eastern Woodlands and Northwest Coast, the show’s selection of indigenous artworks is the finest to be found at a show dedicated solely to American Indian art.

The Vonpischmeyer Collection

The Vonpischmeyer Collection

From Jun 24 2017 to Sep 10 2017

The Mask Museum in Binche presents "The Vonpischmeyer Collection": a "real-fake" collection named after an imaginary explorer and collector - Vonpischmeyer - and whose objects were assembled by a real artist - Olivier Goka. The result is nothing less than surprising: a set of plastic sculptures, whose inspiration was directly drawn from pieces kept in museums of African tribal arts. In this way, Olivier Goka explores the theme of reappropriation of everyday objects in art. He also questions the challenges of recycling; he used a big amount of pieces of plastic, collected, classified and meticulously assembled for years. Discover the offbeat look of an artist who juggles with truth and falsehood, tradition and novelty, sacred and secular wastes of our household appliances and world of consumerism! More information on www.museedumasque.be.

Best Of: A Look at a Collection at MEB

Best Of: A Look at a Collection at MEB

From Sep 14 2016 to Jun 01 2018

The Musée d’Ethnographie de l’Université de Bordeaux is presenting a selection of archives and works from its international collection. Through June 1, 2018, various objects from the world over shed light on the history and expeditions of this century-old institution, the second ethnographic museum, after the Trocadéro, to have opened in France. Moving through the decades, the installation starts with the museum’s founders and collaborators, and it casts light on the importance of its ethnographic collections. More information on: https://meb.u-bordeaux.fr

Six Hundred Years of Receptacles: Tableware Through the Ages

Six Hundred Years of Receptacles: Tableware Through the Ages

From May 17 2017 to Jan 31 2018

Founded in 1977, the Barbier-Mueller Museum is celebrating its fortieth anniversary this year. To mark it, the institution is presenting a special exhibition featuring a hundred works of varied provenances, periods, and cultures drawn from its collection. Six Thousand Years of Receptacles: Tableware Through the Ages was the brainchild of Michel Butor. The late French author selected each object according to the role that its shape suggested to him. He then wrote a short poem for each object. These objects, sometimes masterpieces, now serving as ambassadors for cultures around the planet, are set in dialog with vases by contemporary Western artists. Each is a reflection of the aesthetic criteria prevailing in the culture from which it comes. The ritual or ceremonial contexts in which the pieces were used are also explored. The breadth's exhibition is a fitting tribute to the museum’s founder, Jean Paul Barbier-Mueller, who recently left us.

The boomerang effect

The boomerang effect

From May 19 2017 to Jan 07 2018

The Musée d’Ethnographie de Genève will present a hitherto unseen collection of autochthonous Australian artworks from May 19, 2017, until January 7, 2018. Titled L’effet boomerang. Les arts aborigènes d’Australie (The Boomerang Effect: The Aboriginal Arts of Australia), the exhibition examines the origins of an art tradition that is deeply rooted in its ancestral territory and exists in osmosis with nature. A series of utilitarian objects and artifacts, including boomerangs, spear throwers, clubs, message sticks, etc., demonstrate aspects of Aborigine daily life. Captivating mythological tales and accounts allow insight into their philosophy and spirituality. Using artworks ranging from acrylic paintings of the 1970s to those produced by the Ghost Net Art Project, which started in 2004, the exhibition presents a journey through time from 60,000 years ago to the present, tracing the Aboriginal quest for identity. Rather than being simply aesthetic or utilitarian, the art represents struggle and has a militant dimension.

Where the Thunderbird lives: Cultural Resilience on the Northwest Coast of North America

Where the Thunderbird lives: Cultural Resilience on the Northwest Coast of North America

From Feb 23 2017 to Aug 27 2017

For the first time in its history, the British Museum celebrates the cultural resistance of the native peoples of the Pacific Northwest Coast of the Americas. This exhibition puts special emphasis on the tradition of the Thunderbird, a legendary creature and a symbol of power for many of the region’s cultures. It is linked to the past, present, and future of these peoples, whose cultures are still very much alive. The objects are presented chronologically and according to area of origin. It opens with 2,500-year-old stone tools and ancient weapons. These are followed by historic period art objects that bear witness to the innovative practices and the economic adaptations that these prosperous communities put into place following the arrival of Europeans in the eighteenth century. The peoples of the Northwest Coast have maintained their cultural identity and their way of life in a world that is perpetually changing around them. Their cultures and their artistic patrimonies express powerful values and traditions. One of these was the potlatch, an important prestige event that involved the transfer of wealth, and several of the objects in the installation relate to this tradition. At its end, the exhibition invites the visitor to examine and evaluate his own identity and capacity for cultural resistance in these times of rampant globalization.

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