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Ex-Africa. Histories and Identities of a Universal Art.

Ex-Africa. Histories and Identities of a Universal Art.

From Mar 29 2019 to Sep 08 2019

After Africa. Capolavori da un continente (Africa: Masterpieces of a Continent) (2003) and Africa. Terra degli Spiriti (Africa: Land of the Spirits) (2015), Italy will once again host major works of Sub-Saharan African art this spring in what promises to be a very exciting exhibition called (Ex-Africa. Histories and Identities of a Universal Art), produced by CMS.Cultura and organized by Gigi Pezzoli and Ezio Bassani (to whose memory the event will be dedicated), with the assistance of a number of prestigious Italian and European specialists in the field. The show will offer the visitor a general overview that will lead to deeper understanding of African cultures through the exploration of nine thematic sections featuring some hitherto unseen material. This exhibition aims to highlight the history of art, identity, power, the sacred, meetings and dialogue. Among the main artworks, you will have the chance to see: "Afro-Portuguese ivories" made between the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries by Sapi artist from Sierra leone, the Bini from ancient Benin, Kongo from the current RDC and a corpus of wood and terracotta works that date to the African Middle Ages and created by the Soninke and the Dogon. A beautiful exhibition on view until September 8, 2019 at the Municipal Museum of Archaeology of Bologna.

Parcours des Mondes 2019

Parcours des Mondes 2019

From Sep 10 2019 to Sep 15 2019

The 18th edition of Parcours des Mondes, the World's most important international Tribal Art Event, by the virtue of the number, quality and diversity of it's participating dealers will be held from September 10 to 15. Over 60 internationally known dealers with specialties in the arts of Africa, Oceania, The Americas, Asia and Archeology will gather in the heart of the Saint-Germain-des-Prés neighborhood in Paris. This year, not 3 but 8 participants in the field of archeology will exhibit alongside the main galleries. Several galleries are presenting thematic exhibitions. Among them : "Wild Animals" by Galerie Dodier, "The Art of the Collection: Jan Calmeyn" by Galerie Bernard Dulon, "New Ireland" by Galerie Flak, or "Baulé" by Galerie Lucas Ratton. The historical Saint-Germain-des-Prés neighborhood becomes a veritable open-air museum for the duration of the fair, at which everyone from experienced collectors and professionals to the merely curious can discover exceptional artworks from all five continents. On the occasion of Parcours des Mondes, Tribal Art magazine will welcome you Rue Visconti, 4 with special discount on subscriptions. Parcours des Mondes is THE appointment of the year not to be missed!

Tupuna Ancestors in Transit

Tupuna Ancestors in Transit

From Mar 20 2019 to Sep 20 2019

TAHITI—The Musée de Tahiti et des Îles – Te Fare Manaha is undergoing extensive renovation work, but has a temporary exhibition open through September 20, 2020, that is showing some of its pieces while it is closed. Tupuna –> Transit brings together about 100 of the museum’s most emblematic works representative of the art of French Polynesia’s five archipelagos. This reinstallation of the museum’s collection allows the objects to be seen in a new light and for visitors to accompany the tupuna ancestors in their transition by evoking their histories, their past lives as museum objects, and their culturally relevant futures. This an interesting show with dual aspects. It features art objects but also deals with the issues of conservation, renovation, and restoration that are vital to museum practices nowadays but are often little understood by their audiences. This dimension of the exhibition is unusual and informative.

Félix Fénéon (1861 - 1944)

Félix Fénéon (1861 - 1944)

From May 28 2019 to Sep 29 2019

The Musée d’Orsay, the Musée de l’Orangerie, the musée du quai Branly - Jacques Chirac and The Museum of Modern Art, New York, pay tribute to Félix Fénéon (1861-1944), an important figure in the artistic world in the late 19th and early 20th century. Anarchist, art critic, editor, gallery director and collector, Fénéon espoused an open-minded vision of creation at a time when art was on the verge of the shift to modernity and strove for the recognition of non-western arts. If you don't have the chance to come to Paris to visit the exhibition, become acquainted with this remarkable man through an interview with curators Isabelle Cahn and Philippe Peltier published in the Summer Issue of Tribal Art magazine. It is now available from Tribal Art magazine web site. On view at musée du Quai Branly - Jacques Chirac until September 29, 2019.

The Charles and Valerie Diker Collection

The Charles and Valerie Diker Collection

From Oct 04 2018 to Oct 06 2019

This autumn, two exhibitions of traditional arts from opposite sides of the world will open at the Metropolitan Museum of Art. The first is Art of Native America: The Charles and Valerie Diker Collection, a landmark exhibition that will be installed in the museum’s American Wing showcasing 116 masterworks representing the achievements of artists from more than fifty cultures across North America. Ranging in date from the second to the early twentieth centuries, the diverse works are promised gifts, donations, and loans to the Met from the pioneering collectors Charles and Valerie Diker. Long considered to be the most significant holdings of historical Native American art in private hands, the Diker Collection has particular strengths in sculpture from British Columbia and Alaska, California baskets, pottery from Southwest pueblos, Plains drawings and regalia, and rare accessories from the eastern Woodlands.

Guatemalan Masks: Selections from the Jim and Jeanne Pieper Collection

Guatemalan Masks: Selections from the Jim and Jeanne Pieper Collection

From Apr 07 2019 to Oct 06 2019

Today in Guatemala, masks are worn in spectacular masquerades performed by communities throughout the country during indigenous festivals, Catholic feast days, and secular events. Frequently sponsored by religious organizations known as cofradías, many of these dance-dramas (bailes or danzas) date back to at least the colonial era (1523–1821) and possibly earlier. Elaborately costumed and often highly scripted, the performances bring to life sacred narratives and popular histories, and they serve as public expressions of devotion and communal identity. These performances and the masks used in them draw their power from the interplay of disparate cultural forces and their collective influences. The mask forms include sacred deer and jaguars, saints and serpents, Spanish conquistadors and Maya warriors, cowboys and bulls, and countless mischievous monkeys. Guatemalan Masks: Selections from the Jim and Jeanne Pieper Collection, at the Fowler Museum at UCLA until October 6, 2019, features some eighty of these remarkable masks. They come from the collection of Jim and Jeanne Pieper, who for the last fifty years have traveled to Guatemala, attending festivities across the country and meeting with carvers, masqueraders, and Maya priests to assemble a collection of masks that have accumulated energy from years of use. The collection and its extensive field documentation are promised gifts to the Fowler.

African IncarNations

African IncarNations

From Jun 28 2019 to Oct 06 2019

BRUSSELS—There is a tendency to draw a line of demarcation between traditional and contemporary art, especially in the fi eld of African art, even when they come from periods that are not widely separated in time. The sense of spirituality that unites them is becoming more and more apparent thanks in part to the fact that they are increasingly presented together in exhibitions. Far from being separate worlds with distinct aesthetics, the two universes echo each other, resulting in a dynamic and lively contrast. This spiritual power is underscored in the IncarNations—African Art as Philosophy exhibition at the BOZAR in Brussels from June 28–October 6, 2019. Curated by artist Kendell Geers and collector Sindika Dokolo, this new presentation intends to bring a unified and unifying view to the entirety of African art. Its divine, sacred, and symbolic aspects are emphasized here more than aesthetics, though the past and its masterpieces serve as the cornerstone of the exhibition. These are joined by contemporary works that deal with contemporary issues such as racial and social identity, feminism, animism, and any number of other topics. Together the totality of the complex African identity is examined from multiple perspectives.

Legacy: Selections from the Gillett G. Griffin Collection

Legacy: Selections from the Gillett G. Griffin Collection

From Jul 20 2019 to Oct 06 2019

Legacy: Selections from the Gillett G. Griffin Collection celebrates the life and career of Gillett G. Griffin (1928–2016), highlighting a selection of artworks and artifacts from the thousands that he donated and bequeathed to the Princeton University Art Museum. Griffin was not only a respected curator, scholar, and collector but also a beloved teacher— and one of the most memorable figures in the history of the university and of the Princeton community. Among the fifty-five pieces in the exhibition are Greek, Roman, Egyptian, ancient Near Eastern, Islamic, African, Chinese, Japanese, and Pre-Columbian antiques and antiquities, as well as European and American prints, drawings, and sculptures, showing Griffin’s remarkable range of connoisseurship. A handful of paintings and drawings attest to Griffin’s own talents as an artist. The exhibition opens July 20, 2019, and will be on view through October 6, 2019.

Striking Iron: The Art of African Blacksmiths

Striking Iron: The Art of African Blacksmiths

From Jun 06 2019 to Oct 20 2019

The Art of African Blacksmiths is an international traveling exhibition that combines scholarship with objects of great aesthetic beauty to create the most comprehensive treatment of the blacksmith’s art in Africa. The exhibition includes more than 225 artworks from across the African continent, focusing on the region south of the Sahara and covering a time period spanning early archaeological evidence to the present day. Borrowed from American and European public and private collections, it also features wood sculptures studded with iron, blades, and currencies in a myriad of shapes and sizes, diverse musical instruments, body adornments, an array of ritual accoutrements, tools and weapons, and other important objects that enabled Africans to forage and hunt, till the soil, and assure their own protection and prosperity. Currently presented at the Smithsonian Institution’s National Museum of African Art in Washington, D.C. it will then travel to the Musée du Quai Branly – Jacques Chirac in Paris. A feature about the show is available in the Summer Issue (T92) of Tribal Art magazine.

Good as gold

Good as gold

From Oct 24 2018 to Oct 24 2019

In the cities of the West African nation of Senegal, stylish women have often used jewelry as part of an overall strategy of exhibiting their elegance and prestige. Rooted in the Wolof concept of sanse (dressing up, looking and feeling good), a new long-term exhibition, Good as Gold:Fashioning Senegalese Women, opening October 24, 2018, examines the production, display, and circulation of gold in Senegal. It explores golden adornment as part of a larger dialogic constellation of identity, nationhood, politics, wealth, and individual taste that is largely driven by women. It also celebrates a significant gift of gold jewelry to the National Museum of African Art’s collection. It is guest curated by Amanda M. Maples, curator of African Art at the North Carolina Museum of Art, and its opening will be followed by a full-length publication in spring 2019.