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Allen Memorial Art Museum, Oberlin College

Allen Memorial Art Museum, Oberlin College

87 N Main St. - 44074 Oberlin - OH - United States

No description available.

Alutiiq Museum and Archaeological Repository

Alutiiq Museum and Archaeological Repository

215 Mission Rd., Suite 101 - 99615 Kodiak - AK - United States
Email not available

The Alutiiq Museum opened in 1995 and its collection highlights the Alutiiq, a Pacific Eskimo people who have inhabited the Kodiak Archipelago, Kenai Peninsula, and Alaska Peninsula for more than 7,500 years. The museum is an outgrowth of the cultural programs of the Kodiak Area Native Association. Upon its opening, it received more than 100,000 items from that organization for its collection. Additions to the collections have been made by other Alutiiq corporations and tribal councils, and from excavations performed by the museum and other institutions and universities. Objects of note include a group of artifacts from Larsen Bay (which was the first collection to be reparitated from the Smithsonian Institution under NAGPRA) and Karluk One, a collection that includes remarkably well-preserved wood artifacts from AD 1500–1800. The permanent display collection represents about one percent of the museum’s holdings.

Amelia Island Museum of History

Amelia Island Museum of History

233 S Third St. - 32034 Fernandina Beach - FL - United States

The Amelia Island Museum of History was founded in 1977 as the Fernandina Historical Museum, and moved to the former Nassau County Jailhouse in 1979. In 1989 the museum was renamed, gaining its present moniker, and was accompanied by further renovations to its second floor. In 1990 a significant archeological site at the Amelia Island Plantation revealed the presence of the sixteenth-century Spanish Mission San Carlos, the artifacts from which AIMH became the recipient. Extensive reworking of the museum’s installations was completed in 2003. Among the most notable objects in the Native collection is a Mission Period water pitcher of Spanish design created by a Native American potter. Also of note is a pipehead with a facial carving believed to be Native American in origin. There are many axe-heads, carving tools, banner stones, and pottery shards that represent both the Timucuan and Guale Native cultures of Southeast Georgia and Northeast Florida. There are also artifacts found in Old Town Fernandina which predate European contact, donated by the developers of the archeological site where they were found. Approximately fifteen percent of the museum’s collection—consisting of the most viable artifacts—is on display.

American Museum of Asmat Art

American Museum of Asmat Art

3510 Vivian Ave. - 55126 St. Paul - MN - United States

No description available.

American Museum of Natural History

American Museum of Natural History

Central Park West at 79th St. - 10024 New York - NY - United States
Email not available

The American Museum of Natural History was established in 1869 and is one of the world’s preeminent institutions for scientific research and education, with collections of more than thirty-two million specimens and artifacts. The museum’s zoology and paleontology collections, as well as its planetarium, are vivid memories for those who grew up in New York City. The museum’s Division of Anthropology is dedicated to the study of human culture and biology. It was established in 1873, four years after the founding of the museum. Members of the division carry out ethnological research in Asia; Africa; and North, Central, and South America. Studies include such global topics as warfare and the origins of the state. One of the Anthropology Division’s most important missions is the preservation of and access to the archaeological, ethnological, and physical anthropology collections, assembled from around the world by museum personnel from the time of the museum’s founding to the present day. The collections include more than 500,000 objects from cultures in the Americas, Africa, Asia, and the Greater North Pacific region. They are irreplaceable cultural documents that provide a window into the lives of the people who produced them, and they are resources to be used again and again as new questions are asked about the human experience. The North American ethnographic collection is one of the most comprehensive and well documented in the world, containing various types of artifacts from every Native American cultural region in North America. The Plains ethnological objects are the most significant of the holdings. They were obtained chiefly through the field work of some of the greatest figures in American anthropology. They are well documented both in the Anthropology Division records and in published monographs. The collection represents an extremely important scholarly resource as well as an irreplaceable national treasure to be preserved for future generations. The entire collection with over 49,000 objects is available online at anthro.amnh.org. The African ethnographic collection dates to 1869, the year the museum was founded. The earliest material was donated by or bought from missionaries. Some material was obtained from European museums, auction houses, or received as gifts. At the end of the nineteenth century many explorers and travelers brought objects from Africa that were acquired by the museum. The African collection is extensive in terms of geographic coverage. It includes North Africa, West Africa, and Madagascar, although its greatest concentration of material is from central and southern Africa. The entire collection with over 37,000 objects is also available online. The museum’s library catalogue can be accessed at libcat.amnh.org.

Amerika Museum

Amerika Museum

Grotestraat 62 - 5431 DL Cuijk - Netherlands
Email not available

Since 1973, the American Museum of Cuijk has been home to some 3,000 works from the American continent. For the most part, these objects were brought to Europe by the missionaries of the Ordre des Oblates de Marie, which was founded in 1816 in the south of France. Through the presentation of its objects, photos, and maps, the museum intends to present a complete overview of the cultural patrimony of indigenous Indian and Inuit peoples. The collection of Pre-Columbian Canadian art is particularly strong, and was a gift to the museum by Father Rientjes. Interesting South American archaeological pieces are also included in the collection, with a particular strength in Argentinian material. Due to lack of space, the museum does not have a permanent display, but instead shows a rotating selection of works drawn from its reserves. Its current 2004 exhibition is devoted to North American Indians.

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Amerind Foundation Museum

Amerind Foundation Museum

2100 N Amerind Rd. - 85609 Dragoon - AZ - United States

Amistad Research Center, Tulane University

Amistad Research Center, Tulane University

6823 St. Charles Ave. - 70118 New Orleans - United States
Email not available

No description available.

Anasazi Heritage Center

Anasazi Heritage Center

27501 Hwy. 184 - 81323 Dolores - CO - United States
Email not available

No description available.

Anchorage Museum of History and Art

Anchorage Museum of History and Art

625 C St - 99501 Anchorage - AK - United States

The Anchorage Museum is the largest museum in Alaska and one of the top 10 most visited attractions in the state. This culture, history, art and science museum is the perfect place to get oriented for your travels through Alaska. Galleries are devoted to Alaska Native artifacts, art, Alaska history and hands-on science.