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Abbaye de Daoulas

Abbaye de Daoulas

21 rue de l'église - BP 34 - 29460 Daoulas - France

A former monastery, built in the 12th century by Canons Regular of Saint Augustine,the Abbaye de Daoulas has the rare privilege of possessing numerous points of interest for visitors – the charming gardens with their diverse and fascinating range of plants, the patrimonial aspects of the site, and the discovery of lost or distant cultures through a programme of exhibitions whose focus is the elsewhere, a theme particularly pertinent to this region of travellers.

Abbe Museum

Abbe Museum

26 Mount Desert St. - 04609 Bar Harbor - ME - United States
Email not available

The Abbe Museum was founded in 1928 by eminent New York physician Dr. Robert Abbe as a privately operated trailside museum in Acadia National Park, dedicated to the Native American archaeology of Maine. Its collections soon expanded to include ethnographic and, later, contemporary Maine Native American objects. In 2001 the Abbe expanded into an additional and significantly larger museum in downtown Bar Harbor, with multiple exhibition galleries, areas for educational programs, and space for collections research and storage. The Abbe collection consists entirely of Native American material, primarily from Maine and the Canadian Maritimes, and is the world’s largest single collection of Maine Native American material. The collection numbers approximately 35,000 objects, of which the great majority are archaeological artifacts supporting research and interpretation of 12,000 years of Native American presence in Maine, acquired over the last seventy-five years through donations and scientific excavations. The museum also has more than 1,500 Native American baskets, both historic and contemporary, and other examples of traditional objects such as birchbark containers, beadwork, porcupine quill boxes, clothing, and carved root clubs. This important collection was compiled through donations by Mary Cabot Wheelwright, Watie Akins, Anne Molloy Howells, Diana J. Baker, C. Gardner Lane, Dr. Isaac W. Kingsbury, Ned Jalbert, and many others, as well as through purchases. The historic and contemporary basket collection may well be the largest, best documented Northeastern basketry collection in any museum. It includes early nineteenth-century examples of woven and hand-swabbed storage baskets (band boxes) that date to the earliest period of basketry production among Penobscot weavers. There are several coherent collections of late nineteenth-century fancy baskets, emblematic of the explosion of the art-for-sale movement among Native Americans at that time. The etched birchbark collection includes very early nineteenth-century work by Penobscot and Passamaquoddy artists, signed pieces by Tomah Joseph, and many pieces of Micmac quill embroidery on birchbark. Finally, the contemporary collection, with pieces by well-known active and recent Wabanaki weavers, interprets the recent movement of basketry as fine art.

Le musée des Abénakis

Le musée des Abénakis

108, rue Waban-Aki - Odanak J0G 1H0 - Canada

Founded in 1965 by the elders of Odanak and missionary Rémi Dolan, the Musée des Abénakis was the first Aboriginal museum in Quebec. It is located in the former Catholic school building of the Abenakis community of Odanak on a magnificent site along the St. Francis River. The museum invites you to discover the cultural richness of the Abenakis Nation. Its building was completely renovated and expanded in 2005. Visitors are invited to view permanent and temporary exhibitions with Aboriginal themes, and to participate in cultural and educational discovery activities.

Aberystwyth Art Gallery & Museum

Aberystwyth Art Gallery & Museum

University of Wales - SY23 1NE Aberystwyth - United Kingdom
Email not available

The University of Wales, Aberystwyth was founded in 1872, and its Museum was established in 1876. The university's Art and Crafts Museum, established in 1918, was disbanded as a museum around the time of the Second World War and its collections were dispersed among the school's buildings or put into storage. The university opened new galleries in the late 1980s, and in 1993 and School of Art moved to the Edward Davies Building and formed the School of Art Gallery and Museum. The museum's collection contains more than 18,000 examples of graphic art, ceramics, and sculpture, as well as collections from the former Art and Crafts Museum, including archaeological material, ethnographic artifacts, and more. The ethnographic collections contain basketry from Europe, North America, and Africa alongside groups of weaponry and musical instruments from Polynesia, Africa, New Guinea, and Australia.

Aboriginal Art Museum

Aboriginal Art Museum

Oudegracht 176 - 3511 NP Utrecht - Netherlands

This museum opened in 2001 and is the first in Europe devoted exclusively to the art of the Australian Aborigines. It houses an important collection of contemporary works, which are the most recent artistic expressions of a civilization that is thousands of years old and even today remains poorly understood in many respects. The museum’s material, drawn from the cultural centers of the Central Desert, Arnhem Land, and the Melville Islands, clearly demonstrates the creative wealth of this people with a 60,000-year history and testifies to the diversity of traditional and modern arts, both of which are rooted in the ancestral myths of the Dream Time. The museum presents many temporary exhibitions in which it shows not only its own holdings, but also works from private collections and partner museums. It also features didactic displays for adults and children.

Musée Africain des cultures de l'Afrique de l'Ouest

Musée Africain des cultures de l'Afrique de l'Ouest

150, cours Gambetta - 69361 Lyon - France

Since 1861, the Société des Missions Africaines (Society of African Missions) has been asking its missionaries in Africa to send representative objects from the cultures they visit back to Lyon. The first of those pieces were exhibited at the Salon des Curiosités and then at the Lyon International Exposition in 1894. In 1920, the Musée des Missions Africaines opened its doors in Lyon. This was at the time of the heyday of the artistic world’s newfound recognition of African art. The new Musée Africain de Lyon, entirely remodeled, opened on January 28, 2001. In its 750-square-meter space, it shows 2,126 pieces in 138 vitrines. Objects are arranged according to geographic origin, from coastal regions to forest lands, and from the savanna to the North African coast. In addition to the objects on permanent display, the museum’s reserves contain some 4,000 pieces, which are regularly shown in temporary exhibitions. An important collection of masks from the Côte d’Ivoire and the Nigerian Gelede society are among the noteworthy objects in the collection.

African Art Museum of Maryland

African Art Museum of Maryland

5430 Vantage Point Rd. - 21044 Columbia - MD - United States
Email not available

The African Art Museum of Maryland is dedicated to collecting, exhibiting, researching, and preserving the art of Africa. The museum is housed in the historic 1811 Oakland Building, the second oldest structure in the region, which is owned by the nonprofit community organization, the Columbia Association. The museum’s galleries occupy 750 square feet and contain masks, sculpted figures, textiles, baskets, jewelry, household items, musical instruments, and goldweights. It exhibits African art year-round, reflecting various themes that demonstrate the diversity of Africa. Its exhibitions include both traditional and contemporary African art objects.

African Art Museum of the S.M.A. Fathers

African Art Museum of the S.M.A. Fathers

23 Bliss Ave. - 07670 Tenafly - NJ - United States
Email not available

The African Art Museum of the SMA Fathers is one of five museums around the world founded and maintained by the Society of African Missions (SMA), an international Roman Catholic missionary organization that serves the people of Africa. The order’s founder, Bishop Melchior de Marion Bresillac (1813–1859), urged his society to respect and preserve the culture of the peoples they served, a unique vision among missionaries of his time. Established in 1980, the Tenafly museum is dedicated solely to the arts of Africa. Its permanent collection, exhibited on a rotating basis, offers a unique perspective in the study and research of sub-Saharan sculpture, painting, costumes, textiles, and decorative arts, as well as religion and folklore. The museum’s collection continues to grow through private donation.

Afrika Museum

Afrika Museum

Postweg 6 - 6571 CS Berg En Dal - Netherlands

n 1954, a missionary museum was created in Berg-en-Dal, where the Fathers of the Holy Spirit had acquired a property five years earlier, which was to become a place of rest for the members of their congregation. The museum’s founding addressed the desire of the Fathers to pay homage to the African cultures they had encountered and to increase awareness of these cultures in Europe. Missionaries stationed in Africa that occasionally brought back objects for the colonial exhibitions became, therefore, collectors of objects that were both evidence of religious practices and of daily life and were sometimes destined for sale in the museum’s store. The museum owes its development to Father J.B. Van Croonenburg. He enriched the museum with his dynamism and his deep sensitivity to the artistic qualities of African sculpture. He sought to attract a broad public to admire the beauty and richness of African culture. Several other priests were also interested in these cultures that others qualified as “primitive.” Father Jan Vissers, stationed in the Cabinda area, actively fought against the destruction of the traditional objects of the Woyo and collected a group of pottery lids with figural sculptures. The museum has been a popular success since its opening, thanks both to the excellent quality of its collection, which is considered to be the most interesting in the Netherlands, and its efforts to produce modern and attractive displays for them. In 1987 the museum inaugurated its “museum outside its walls” display, which today consists of several reconstituted African villages, including the riverside village of Toffinou in Benin and an earthen village of the Dogon in Mali. This uniqu

Afrika Centrum

Afrika Centrum

Rijksweg 15 - 6267 AC Cadier en Keer - Netherlands

The Fathers of the Society of African Missions founded a small seminary at Cadier-en-Keer in 1892. In the course of their work, the missionaries of this order collected masks, sculptures, and ethnographic objects from the West African countries of Côte d’Ivoire, Ghana, and Nigeria. The present museum was created in 1959, largely as a result of the efforts of Father Van Tright, who felt that this important collection should be available to the public. Its goal was, and remains, to stimulate interest in these faraway regions and to increase awareness of the peoples who inhabit them. The museum’s current permanent exhibition consists of ancient and traditional works shown along with contemporary arts on three levels of the building. The artworks are presented to evoke the realities of daily life in Africa. The museum presents four temporary exhibitions every year.