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Musée des Beaux-arts et d’Histoire naturelle de Châteaudun

Musée des Beaux-arts et d’Histoire naturelle de Châteaudun

3, rue Toufaire - 28200 Châteaudun - France

Established in 1897 after the archaeological collections of the Dunoise Society, paintings donated by the government and the huge collection of birds belonging to the Marquis of Tarragon were brought together under one roof, the Châteaudun Municipal Museum of Fine Art and Natural History boasts: a permanent exhibition of Egyptian art, an exhibition of Oriental art, a room of paintings (donated by the government and local 19th century painters), an ornithological collection and a room dedicated to dioramas, a local archaeological collection (prehistoric tools and objects from the Gallo-Roman and Medieval periods), a local history room looking at the 1870 Prussian war and the fire that devastated the town, the Beauceron area, illustrating a 19th century family home, and a 19th century Neolithic stone collection. Artistic, scientific and/or fun temporary exhibitions and a series of educational activities with themed tours are organised, connected to class or school projects.

Musée des Beaux-Arts de Caen

Musée des Beaux-Arts de Caen

Le Château - 14000 Caen - France

Based in the heart of William the Conqueror’s Château, in a modern building, the Museum of Fine Art is one of France’s biggest museums exhibiting 16th and 17th European painting (from France, Italy, Flanders and Holland), while its collection of engravings make it well worth a visit. A range of activities (tours, workshops, concerts etc.) are put on to introduce members of the public to its riches. The museum organises several temporary exhibitions every year, alternating between ancient, modern and contemporary art as well as paintings, drawings, engravings and photographs. Since 2007, the medieval château has also housed a sculpture park.

Musée des Beaux-arts et de la Dentelle d’Alençon

Musée des Beaux-arts et de la Dentelle d’Alençon

Place Foch – CS 50 362 - 61 014 Alençon - France

The Fine Arts and Lacework Museum of Alencon welcomes you in refined surroundings in the heart of the square courtyard of Lacework, formerly the town’s Jesuit college.   Find out about a unique skill known as ‘Point d’Alençon’, registered on UNESCO’s Masterpieces of the Oral and Intangible Heritage of Humanity List. Lift the veil on its history and its links with the greatest of European lacework. Plunge into the heart of the fine arts collection from the 17th to the 20th centuries or escape to Cambodia with the Adhémard Leclère collection, which is extraordinarily rich.   The museum is constantly being renewed and enriched with temporary exhibitions, guided tours, workshops for the young. Prepare to be amazed!  

Belvue Museum

Belvue Museum

Place des Palais, 7 - 1000 Brussels - Belgium

The history of Belgium as you have never seen it before ! The revolution of 1830, the colonisation of Congo, the defence of the civil rights, the royal question, the golden sixties, ...since its creation less than two centuries ago, Belgium has lived an eventful and existing history ! Discover the highlights of this history by walking through the nine rooms of the museum. Each room represents an era : you will immediately be immerged in the atmosphere thanks to music, multiple historical documents, movie trailers and artefacts. On the same occasion you will learn all about the Belgian sovereigns, presented in the corridors connecting the rooms. In all, more than 1500 documents, movies, photographs and artefacts are staged and will guide you through the fascinating history of our country.

Bernice Pauahi Bishop Museum

Bernice Pauahi Bishop Museum

1525 Bernice Street - 96817 Honolulu - HI - United States

Bishop Museum was founded in 1889 by Charles Reed Bishop in honor of his late wife, Princess Bernice Pauahi Bishop, the last descendant of the royal Kamehameha family. The Museum was established to house the extensive collection of Hawaiian artifacts and royal family heirlooms of the Princess, and has expanded to include millions of artifacts, documents and photographs about Hawai‘i and other Pacific island cultures. Today, Bishop Museum is the largest museum in the state and the premier natural and cultural history institution in the Pacific, recognized throughout the world for its cultural collections, research projects, consulting services and public educational programs. It also has one of the largest natural history specimen collections in the world. Serving and representing the interests of Native Hawaiians is a primary purpose of the Museum.

Bibliotheque Sainte Geneviève/ Cabinet de curiosités

Bibliotheque Sainte Geneviève/ Cabinet de curiosités

10, place du Panthéon - 75005 Paris - France

Sainte-Geneviève Abbey’s museum of curiosities was introduced by Father du Molinet in the 17th century. In 1660, this enlightened priest started to collect rare and unusual natural and archaeological objects. In the 18th century, the collection was open to an elite group who could discover both its natural curiosities and its “savageries” from different continents. However, unlike the library, the museum of curiosities was not spared by the Revolution, and its collections were scattered. The library however managed to hold on to some of the items in the museum, including in particular a number of ethnographic pieces that are unusual due to their age (16th – 18th centuries) collected from voyages of discovery, like a Huron puzzle and a Native American ceremonial staff from the Arawak civilisation, dating back to the 17th century.

Bowers Museum

Bowers Museum

2002 North Main Street - 92706 Santa Ana - CA - United States
Email not available

Founded in 1936 by the City of Santa Ana through a bequest from Charles and Ada Bowers, the Bowers Museum is one of California's finest and Orange County's largest museums. In 1986, the museum closed its doors for a period of self-study. In response to community needs and input, it reopened in 1992 as a new cultural center, and expanded children's programming in 1994 with the opening of the Kidseum. The museum also recently celebrated the grand opening of the 30,000+ square-foot Dorothy and Donald Kennedy Wing in February 2007. To achieve its mission, the Bowers offers exhibitions, lectures, art classes, travel programs, children's art education programs, and other special community programs.

British Museum

British Museum

Great Russell St WC1B 3DG - WC1B 3DG London - United Kingdom

Established by an Act of Parliament in 1753 and opened in 1759, the British Museum was founded upon the private collection of physician, naturalist, and collector Sir Hans Sloane (1660–1753), who willed more than 71,000 objects, along with his library and herbarium, to the British Crown. The original collections largely consisted of books, manuscripts, and natural history, with some antiquities and ethnographical materials. Sir William Hamilton's collection of Greek vases and other classical objects was purchased in 1772, followed by the Rosetta Stone and other Egyptian antiquities in 1802. The Townley Collection of classical sculpture was acquired in 1805, and the sculptures of the Parthenon, known as the Elgin Marbles, in 1816. The British Museum was greatly involved in excavation abroad, and the appointment in 1851 of Sir Augustus Wollaston Franks (1826–97) led to the growth of such fields as British and European prehistory, ethnography, Oriental art, and archaeology. The museum was a new type of institution from the outset, governed by a body of trustees responsible to Parliament, preserving a collection owned by the nation, and open free of charge to the public. First housed in a seventeenth-century mansion, Montagu House, which stood on the site of today's building, it has undergone a variety of divisions and expansions since its inception. In 1823, the gift to the nation by George IV of his father's library (the King's Library) led to the construction of the current quadrangular building, which was designed by Sir Robert Smirke and completed in 1857. In the 1880s, the natural history collections were moved to a new building in South Kensington, which became the Natural History Museum. This departure and the construction of the White Wing made room for the increasing collections. King Edward VII's Galleries, which opened in 1914, the Duveen Gallery (1939/62), and the New Wing (1978) provided additional facilities and space. The museum's library became part of the new British Library in 1973, and the books left for a new building at St. Pancras in 1997. The Queen Elizabeth II Great Court, which was created in part of the space vacated by the library, opened in 2000. Around and beneath it new galleries were built, including the Sainsbury Africa Galleries, the Wellcome Gallery, and the Clore Education Centre. The restored King's Library opened in 2003. In the late 1960s, storage and exhibition of the museum's ethnographic collections was temporarily moved to the Museum of Mankind in London's Burlington Gardens. There they were maintained for 27 years, until the auxiliary museum's closure. The collections that were diverted to the Museum of Mankind have been gradually reintegrated into the British Museum since that time, and the completion of the new Andean and Pacific Galleries, scheduled for 2008–2010, will make the transition final. Today, the museum holds vast and important collections of art from Africa, Oceania, and the Americas; antiquities from ancient Egypt and Sudan; Asian art; international coins and medals; Classical treasures from Greece and Rome; Middle Eastern art; European art and antiquities from prehistory to the modern period; prints and drawings; and remarkable works in precious metals and stones. The collection of the Department of Africa, Oceania, and the Americas includes around 350,000 objects, most of which were acquired during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries and largely date from this time.

Brooklyn Museum

Brooklyn Museum

200 Eastern Pkwy. - 11238 Brooklyn - NY - United States

The Brooklyn Museum, housed in a 560,000-square-foot beaux arts building, is the second-largest museum in New York City and one of the largest in the United States. Its world-renowned permanent collections include more than one million objects, ranging from ancient Egyptian masterpieces to contemporary art. The mission of the museum is to serve as a bridge between the rich artistic heritages of cultures around the world. The origins of the Brooklyn Museum go back to 1823, when its ancestor institution was founded as the Brooklyn Apprentices’ Library Association. In 1890 the museum evolved into the wide-ranging Brooklyn Institute of Arts and Sciences. Construction on the current facility, based on plans by the architectural firm McKim, Mead & White, began in 1895 and continued for more than thirty years. The building’s architectural sculpture was executed by Daniel Chester French, better known for his colossal statue of Abraham Lincoln in the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, D.C. In the mid-eighties, plans for major renovations were approved, and have been ongoing since. The museum’s Department of Ethnology was established in 1903, with Stewart Culin serving as its curator until 1929. Under his guidance, the museum developed an extraordinary collection. This included a Native American art collection strong in Zuni and Hopi items, and a large Central African collection purchased in Belgium in 1922. Though the department name changed a number of times over the years, non-Western material continued to be administrated as a whole until 2001, when it split into the departments of the Arts of Africa and the Pacific Islands, the Arts of the Americas, Decorative Arts, and Asian Art. The Brooklyn Museum was the first museum in the United States to devote a permanent gallery to the display of African objects as works of art. Recently reinstalled, the African display collection now features 250 works, including a remarkable sixteenth century carved ivory double gong from the court of Benin and an eighteenth century ndop portrait sculpture of King Mishe miShyaang maMbul of the Kuba people of central Congo, both of which are the only objects of their kind in the United States. The museum’s Arts of the Americas installation includes some of the most important Andean textiles in the world. Other notable features include a fifteenth-century Aztec stone jaguar and a new presentation of Peruvian art, including significant textiles, ceramics, and gold objects. There is also an outstanding collection of Native American textiles, ceramics, totem poles, statuary, headdresses, and masks.

Bruce Museum

Bruce Museum

1 Museum Drive - 06830 Greenwich - CT - United States

The Museum was originally built as a private home in 1853. Robert Moffat Bruce (1822-1909), a wealthy textile merchant and member of the New York Cotton Exchange, bought the house and property in 1858 and deeded them to the Town on Greenwich in 1908. In 1992, the Bruce Museum undertook a complete renovation of its 139-year-old building. Reopened in September 1993, the redesigned Bruce is an architectural model of museum quality. In 1998 the Bruce Museum received accreditation from the American Association of Museums, an honor granted to fewer than 5% of all museums. Sitting high on a hill overlooking Greenwich Harbor, the Bruce Museum offers a changing array of exhibitions and educational programs that promote the understanding and appreciation of art and science. The Bruce Museum has been voted the best museum in Fairfield County by area media in recent years, a recognition of its growing popularity and efforts to consistently address new subjects of remarkable beauty or great interest with new insights, The Bruce plays an integral role in the cultural life of area residents and attracts approximately 100,000 visitors annually, reaching out to families, seniors, students, the handicapped, at-risk children, and community organizations. The Bruce Museum in Greenwich, Connecticut, presents more than a dozen new exhibitions in art and science every year.