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Hawaii

Hawaii

From Oct 14 2017 to May 13 2018

In this show, the Linden Museum will focus on the culture and history of Hawaii’s first inhabitants. The exhibition examines nearly 250 years of Hawaiian art, from the time of the arrival of the first Europeans to the modern day. Two hundred art objects have been brought together for the occasion, coming from the collection of the Linden Museum and from those of other German and European museums. Together they provide a solid overview of the ancestral skills, artistic procedures, and the political and religious aspects of indigenous Hawaiian society. The show explores the connections that continue today as part of Hawaiian cultural life deriving from certain important forms of aesthetic expression rooted in the past, such as dance (hula) and tattooing (kakau). It closes with a presentation of the work of six contemporary indigenous artists.

Territory of Dreams

Territory of Dreams

From Dec 01 2017 to May 20 2018

From December 1, 2017, an exhibition at the Pierre Arnaud Foundation will showcase contemporary Aboriginal art. Over one hundred works will be featured, most from the Bérengère Primat Collection. Together they illustrate the diversity, richness, and vitality of this art, which has its roots in a 65,000-year-old culture that was all but unrecognized in Western art circles until the 1970s. Aboriginal art raises a number of cultural, artistic, political, and ecological questions, as exemplified by the work of the Ghost Net weavers. These Torres Strait Islander artists create works from the lost or abandoned plastic fishing nets in the sea that threaten to destroy the fragile marine ecosystem on which their survival depends. Since time immemorial, Aboriginal artists have created representations of the Dream and the voyages of the Dreaming Ancestors, which are seen as the basis of human existence. These subjects, as well as that of the reciprocal connection between man and the earth (and the sea) are the exhibition’s common thread. Territoire du Rêve. It has five parts: the territory of the Dream; Arnhem Land and its bark works; the art of the Australians of the desert regions and the Papunya Tula school; the art of the Kimberley area; and the Ghost Net weaving described above. Although it has existed for millennia, Aboriginal art has renewed itself through the integration of new techniques while retaining its unique spiritual power.

The Mentawai from Indonesia

The Mentawai from Indonesia

From Oct 20 2017 to May 27 2018

This exhibition was launched thanks to a recent donation of a part of the Reimar Schefold collection to the Museum Volkenkunde (https://volkenkunde.nl) at Leiden University, where he was professor emeritus of cultural anthropology and sociology of Indonesia. Visitors can discover ancient traditions alongside contemporary expressions of one of earth’s last thriving indigenous cultures: the Mentawai. This people inhabits for centuries the Mentawai Islands, an archipelago about 150 kilometers off the western coast of Sumatra. Their religious beliefs continue to shape their thoughts and actions. Being animist, they believe that all things in nature, whether plant or utensil, possess a soul. Everything must therefore be treated with respect, and this is why they live simply and in harmony with the natural world that surrounds them. The exhibition focuses on the question of how traditions continue to maintain their values today. To what extent do the Mentawai want to be part of a globalizing world? Can they combine old traditions with a modern way of life? It coincides with the publication of the book "Toys for the Souls: Life and Art on the Mentawai Islands", authored by Reimar Schefold (http://www.tribalartmagazine.com/fischbacher/art-books/?a=view&id=382&lang=fr). For more info discover the exclusive interview of Reimar Schefold in Tribal Art magazine 85.

The Great Inka Road: Engineering an Empire

The Great Inka Road: Engineering an Empire

From Oct 01 2015 to Jun 01 2018

The Smithsonian’s National Museum of the American Indian is presenting The Great Inka Road: Engineering an Empire, the first major bilingual exhibition on one of the great civilizations of South America. It will explore why the Inka Road was built more than 500 years ago; for what purpose; and how its construction, without the use of metal, the wheel, or draft animals to pull heavy loads, stands as one of the world’s greatest engineering feats. Over its more than 100 years of use over the duration of the Inka Empire from the fourteenth century to the Spanish invasion in 1532, the extensive road served as a major axis for communication, transportation, expansion, administration, and political control. After the Spanish invasion, the road lost political meaning but never lost its signifi cance as a symbol and sacred space to the indigenous peoples in the region. Through images, maps, models, and 140 objects in the exhibition together illustrate important concepts in Andean cosmology and the principles of duality, reciprocity, and integration, while also offering examples of the road’s infrastructure and spirituality.

Best Of: A Look at a Collection at MEB

Best Of: A Look at a Collection at MEB

From Sep 14 2016 to Jun 01 2018

The Musée d’Ethnographie de l’Université de Bordeaux is presenting a selection of archives and works from its international collection. Through June 1, 2018, various objects from the world over shed light on the history and expeditions of this century-old institution, the second ethnographic museum, after the Trocadéro, to have opened in France. Moving through the decades, the installation starts with the museum’s founders and collaborators, and it casts light on the importance of its ethnographic collections. More information on: https://meb.u-bordeaux.fr

Jewelry ... Among Other Things

Jewelry ... Among Other Things

From Dec 13 2017 to Jun 03 2018

"Sieraden: makers en dragers" ("Jewelry: Made By, Worn By") is an homage to jewelry makers and presents more than a thousand objects from around the world. It explores manufacturing techniques as well as the history of each piece, whether ornaments made of gold, silver, and precious stones or of glass, shells, and seeds. All are the finest examples of their type from Holland’s four most important ethnographic museums. Part of the exhibition is devoted to contemporary creations inspired by ancestral traditions. The show will be held at the Volkenkunde Museum in Leiden and will be on view from December 13, 2017, until June 3, 2018. For more info please visit: https://volkenkunde.nl

Coiling Culture: Basketry Art of Native North America

Coiling Culture: Basketry Art of Native North America

From Sep 10 2016 to Aug 26 2018

Baskets were one of the first art forms in the Americas, with basket fragments found in California and the Southwest dating to 9,400 years ago. Over the millennia, native North Americans developed elaborate techniques and intricate designs worked in local materials, from sweetgrass in Florida to black ash in the Northeast and deer grass in California, among many others. These materials were sacred to their makers and those who used these special containers. So too was the way each was made with coiling, especially poignant, symbolizing for many groups the path of human emergence from inside earth and the movement of the spirits between realms. This display in the Art of the Americas' galleries explores the intersection between material, making, and meaning in the fragile basketry art of the Southeast to the Southwest and up into the Arctic.

Collection Notes

Collection Notes

From May 16 2017 to Sep 02 2018

In this exhibition, the Musée des Confluences in Lyon is offering a fresh look at its anthropological and natural history collections. This is a rare opportunity to travel through time to see how those collections were formed and how they have contributed to scientific research. The exhibition opens with the eighteenth century, a time when, within the contexts of exploration and colonization, objects from around the world developed scientific relevance. Explorers of all kinds collected innumerable objects from Africa, Oceania, and the Americas. Masks, items of clothing, weapons, utilitarian objects, and items intended for ritual use began to be used to document hitherto unknown lands. Private collectors and dealers in antiques and natural history specimens became important sources and donors for the museum. Ultimately, the intent of the exhibition is to explore what the museum holdings are today and what the patrimony of the future will be.

The Ramanyana narrated by the masks Rajbanchi

The Ramanyana narrated by the masks Rajbanchi

From Dec 22 2017 to Oct 28 2018

From 22 December 2017 until 28 October 2018, this exhibition takes you on a journey through the northern regions of India and southern Nepal. It was born from a dream: to create a museum in Nepal that celebrates the arts of Nepalese or neighboring ethnic minorities. A set of 90 ancient masks evokes the Ramayana. This long mythological epic tells of Rama's struggle to recover his wife, Sita, abducted by Ravana, 10-headed demon of Ceylon, with the help of Hanuman and his army of monkeys. It is commemorated during shows performed by inhabitants who, for several days, play the major events of this story by climbing or masking. Some paintings of the Mithila and a series of textiles from Bhutan enrich the collection which offers a wide panorama of the artistic production of a people too often ignored. The exhibition is held at the Bernard and Caroline de Watteville Foundation in Crans-Montana, Switzerland. More information about tne exhibition available on : www.art-et-collections.ch

Tuareg, Nomad Tales

Tuareg, Nomad Tales

From Oct 17 2017 to Nov 04 2018

Perceived by their Western colonizers as everything from noble and chivalrous to bloodthirsty and savage, the image of the Tuareg that was built up during colonial times remains firmly rooted in many minds. In "Touaregs, récits nomades", the Musée des Confluences challenges these stereotypes and reveals the Tuareg in all of their complexity and dynamism. The first part focuses on the watercolors of Paul-Elie Dubois, as well as on archival documents and popular items. It then moves on to the remarkable collection of jewelry and amulets donated by the Masnat Association in 2015. These create an immersive experience in the Tuareg aesthetic universe, which is characterized by restraint, equilibrium, a distinctive geometry, and a unique use of color. Excerpts from poems accompany the presentation. Finally, the exhibition examines how the Tuareg are changing their traditional codes while at the same time reaffirming their identity. Like the jewelry they adapt to Western uses, they are reappropriating an idealized Western image to diffuse their culture, to make their demands known, and to enter into a new form of resistance.