News: Filter by dates
Between...
...and...
News: Filter by types
Exhibitions
Shows/Fair
Conferences
Public auctions
Book signings
*Uncheck the unneeded types
News: Filter by topics
Antiques
Archaeology
Aboriginal art
African art
Native american Art
Asian art
South-east asian art
Eskimo art
Indonesian art
Oceanic art
Precolumbian art
Tribal art
*Uncheck the unneeded topics
News: Filter by location
*Type a geographical location (a continent, a country, a state or a city)
News: Filter by keyword
*Type a keyword here above

Latest news

Filter by...
  • Date
  • .
  • Type
  • .
  • Topic
  • .
  • Location
  • .
  • Keyword
The Southern Athabaskans

The Southern Athabaskans

From Dec 10 2017 to Jul 07 2019

The Museum of Indian Arts and Culture in Santa Fe is exhibiting more than 100 cultural objects dating from the late 1880s to the present and representing the lifeways of the different Apachean groups in New Mexico and Arizona. "Lifeways of the Southern Athabaskans" features basketry, beaded clothing, and hunting and horse gear from the Jicarilla Apache, Mescalero Apache, Fort Sill Apache (Chiricahua), San Carlos Apache, and White Mountain Apache—distinct cultural groups that are connected by a common language. This show provides a rare glimpse into the cosmology and daily lives of diverse Apache groups, detailing not only how these items were used in everyday life but also the belief systems and cosmology symbolized in their construction.

OCEANIA exhibition now in Paris

OCEANIA exhibition now in Paris

From Mar 12 2019 to Jul 07 2019

PARIS—Following its historic opening at London’s Royal Academy of Arts last year, the exhibition Oceania will be making some voyages of its own. Its first port of call will be the Musée du Quai Branly – Jacques Chirac, where it will be on view in the Galerie Jardin March 12–July 7, 2019. Contemporary and antique artworks will mingle and mix in this installation just as they did at its British venue. The exhibition places emphasis on the exchanges, encounters, and hybrid phenomena that long characterized this vast region of 25,000 islands. These occurred through native interisland contact as well as that of colonial invaders. This focus forms the common thread through which the diversity of the vast region’s art is presented. Quai Branly will also host an exhibition titled Anting-Anting, on view March 12–May 26, 2019, which explores the meanings of the eponymous amulets of the Philippines.

Masks of the World

Masks of the World

From Mar 23 2019 to Jul 20 2019

The mask is perhaps the most coveted of all non-Western art objects. It exists in myriad forms among nearly all of the peoples and cultures of Africa, South America, Oceania, and Asia. They may be relatively naturalistic, sometimes zoomorphic, others geometric or abstract, and they come in all shapes and sizes. They may be used in rites of passage, as ritual tools, emblems of power, or catalysts for transformation. One conceals oneself or sometimes discovers oneself with masks. All of them, from the wooden African masks of the Songye, Kota, and Punu to the stone examples of Teotihuacan, have fascinated aficionados and collectors for many decades, and it can even be said that many types of African masks have become the prime representatives of the cultures they come from. From March 23–July 20, 2019, the Cité Miroir in Liège will be presenting the exhibition titled Masks, which has already been seen in Beijing and Tokyo and is made up of some eighty examples on loan from the Musée du Quai Branly – Jacques Chirac.

Reimagining Captain Cook

Reimagining Captain Cook

From Nov 29 2019 to Aug 04 2019

The voyages of Oceanic explorer Captain James Cook, whose legacy is now seen by many as controversial, profoundly and durably marked vast areas of the Pacific. Even today, he remains a larger-than-life figure to whom responsibility for the course of history is assigned, and he retains an almost mythical status in the works of Pacifi c artists. The British Museum is honoring this pivotal figure with a show of artworks from the South Seas on view until August 4, 2019, that reveal how he has been represented. Artists Michel Tuffery, Lisa Reihana, and Steve Gibbs revisit the life and work of this famed captain, who departed the shores of England 250 years ago to sail into the great unknown.

Hearts of People: Native Women Artists

Hearts of People: Native Women Artists

From Jun 02 2019 to Aug 18 2019

Women have long been the creative force behind Native American art. Presented in close cooperation with top Native women artists and scholars, Hearts of Our People: Native Women Artists, on view at the Minneapolis Institute of Arts, will be the first major exhibition of artwork by Native women. It will celebrate the achievements of more than 115 artists from the United States and Canada spanning over 1,000 years. Their triumphs—from pottery, textiles, and painting, to photographic portraits, to a gleaming El Camino—reveal astonishing innovation and technical mastery. The show was curated by Jill Ahlberg Yohe and Teri Greeves working in consultation with a Native Exhibition Advisory Board, a panel of twenty-one Native artists and Native and non-Native scholars from across North America, who provided insights from a wide range of nations at every step in the curatorial process. It will be on view June 2–August 18, 2019, and is presented by the Shakopee Mdewakanton Sioux Community.

Grey is the new pink: moments of ageing

Grey is the new pink: moments of ageing

From Oct 25 2018 to Sep 01 2019

How do we deal with the political, social, and scientific problems that the world’s ever-increasing older population gives rise to? How can this inexorable aging process be approached from a multicultural perspective? And how can it be interpreted in an artistic and, most importantly, optimistic perspective? Artists all over the world are exploring the possibilities, each according to their own traditions, points of view, and the cultural baggage they carry. Every culture has its own conceptions of aging and of the stages of life. Will there eventually be a universal notion of “age” and in particular of advanced age? What can we learn from our neighbors about ways to manage our elderly population? These are questions that Grey is the New Pink: Moments of Aging, on view until September 1, 2019, at the Weltkulturen Museum addresses through the presentation of works by more than fifteen multinational artists. It invites reflection upon cultural contradictions and places the museum squarely in the realm of social discourse.

Kini ke Kua: Transformative Images

Kini ke Kua: Transformative Images

From Feb 16 2019 to Sep 02 2019

The Bernice Pauahi Bishop Museum is presenting Kini ke Kua: Transformative Images, an exhibit that explores relationships between ki'i (images) and people. From sculptures to photographs and contemporary renderings, the exhibition presents a multifaceted installation of such images from the Bishop’s collection and contemporary indigenous art and practice. It is on view until Sept. 2, 2019. Ki‘i are a cornerstone of Hawaiian spirituality and can take many forms. Fashioned from wood, stone, and other natural materials, ki‘i become embodiments of deity: representations of akua (gods) and aumākua (personal or family guardians). This exhibit explores some of the ways in which relationships between ki'i and people may change and how and why some of those changes have occurred. At the center of the exhibition is the kii long held in the Vérité Collection, recently gifted to the Bishop Museum by Salesforce Chairman and CEO Marc Benioff and his wife, Lynne.

Ex-Africa. Histories and Identities of a Universal Art.

Ex-Africa. Histories and Identities of a Universal Art.

From Mar 29 2019 to Sep 08 2019

After Africa. Capolavori da un continente (Africa: Masterpieces of a Continent) (2003) and Africa. Terra degli Spiriti (Africa: Land of the Spirits) (2015), Italy will once again host major works of Sub-Saharan African art this spring in what promises to be a very exciting exhibition called (Ex-Africa. Histories and Identities of a Universal Art), produced by CMS.Cultura and organized by Gigi Pezzoli and Ezio Bassani (to whose memory the event will be dedicated), with the assistance of a number of prestigious Italian and European specialists in the field. The show will offer the visitor a general overview that will lead to deeper understanding of African cultures through the exploration of nine thematic sections featuring some hitherto unseen material. This exhibition aims to highlight the history of art, identity, power, the sacred, meetings and dialogue. Among the main artworks, you will have the chance to see: "Afro-Portuguese ivories" made between the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries by Sapi artist from Sierra leone, the Bini from ancient Benin, Kongo from the current RDC and a corpus of wood and terracotta works that date to the African Middle Ages and created by the Soninke and the Dogon. A beautiful exhibition on view until September 8, 2019 at the Municipal Museum of Archaeology of Bologna.

The Charles and Valerie Diker Collection

The Charles and Valerie Diker Collection

From Oct 04 2018 to Oct 06 2019

This autumn, two exhibitions of traditional arts from opposite sides of the world will open at the Metropolitan Museum of Art. The first is Art of Native America: The Charles and Valerie Diker Collection, a landmark exhibition that will be installed in the museum’s American Wing showcasing 116 masterworks representing the achievements of artists from more than fifty cultures across North America. Ranging in date from the second to the early twentieth centuries, the diverse works are promised gifts, donations, and loans to the Met from the pioneering collectors Charles and Valerie Diker. Long considered to be the most significant holdings of historical Native American art in private hands, the Diker Collection has particular strengths in sculpture from British Columbia and Alaska, California baskets, pottery from Southwest pueblos, Plains drawings and regalia, and rare accessories from the eastern Woodlands.

Good as gold

Good as gold

From Oct 24 2018 to Oct 24 2019

In the cities of the West African nation of Senegal, stylish women have often used jewelry as part of an overall strategy of exhibiting their elegance and prestige. Rooted in the Wolof concept of sanse (dressing up, looking and feeling good), a new long-term exhibition, Good as Gold:Fashioning Senegalese Women, opening October 24, 2018, examines the production, display, and circulation of gold in Senegal. It explores golden adornment as part of a larger dialogic constellation of identity, nationhood, politics, wealth, and individual taste that is largely driven by women. It also celebrates a significant gift of gold jewelry to the National Museum of African Art’s collection. It is guest curated by Amanda M. Maples, curator of African Art at the North Carolina Museum of Art, and its opening will be followed by a full-length publication in spring 2019.