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“Wax Fever” Breaks Out in Barcelona

“Wax Fever” Breaks Out in Barcelona

From Jun 20 2019 to Jul 27 2019

This summer, Guilhem Montagut Gallery is launching an unusual—indeed possibly unprecedented— project. For Wax Fever: From Africa to Barcelona, which will open on June 20, 2019, the Catalan dealer is giving guest curator Elena Martínez-Jacquet carte blanche for a two-pronged exhibition that will feature Cora & Lea brand African wax-print garments displayed in conjunction with African art objects. This will be the third exhibition at the gallery’s recently inaugurated space on Pau Claris street, and it will be an opportunity to provide context to these wax-resist textiles, which have become so pervasive throughout Africa that their European and colonial origins are often forgotten. In the exhibition, these will be juxtaposed with an array of traditional works to which they relate. Textiles sometimes borrow designs or ideas from other art forms or concepts, and, in Africa, a longstanding textile tradition attests to the importance of decoration and the body. A final creative element in this multifaceted show is photography. Rocio Durand will present works that lie at the intersection of fashion and art. This hybrid, innovative, and inspiring exhibition will be on view through July 27.

Summer with Jacques Germain

Summer with Jacques Germain

From Jun 22 2019 to Jul 27 2019

For many years now, Jacques Germain has been on a mission to promote interest in African art in his native Canada and to help develop fi ne private collections there. This summer, he is putting on an exhibition that will be available for the public to see by appointment from June 22–July 27, 2019, that honors today’s active Canadian collectors. It will feature major pieces, such as a Yombe maternity figure that formerly belonged to renowned artist Antoni Tàpies, and every piece in the show will be drawn from Canadian collections. The diversity and quality of the objects on display attest to the maturity and taste of the “young tribe” of Canadian collectors and will themselves undoubtedly generate more new interest.

Bourgogne and the Idols

Bourgogne and the Idols

From May 30 2019 to Jul 28 2019

The Bourgogne Tribal Show is preparing an ambitious fourth installment this year. Held once again in its usual bucolic setting, it is opening itself to other art disciplines— contemporary and modern art; medieval art; the classical arts of China, India, and Japan; and Egyptian antiquities. Material from these fields will complement the quality works of African, Oceanic, and Native American art that have been the show’s mainstay since its inception. As always, the venue for the fair will be the estate of contemporary art dealer Bruno Mory, located near Besanceuil. It will be held from May 30–June 2, 2019, and an exhibition intended for the general public will also be on view in the Farinier building at the Abbaye de Cluny through July 28. Titled Idols, it is the brainchild of wellknown visual artist and tribal art enthusiast Coco Fronsac.

Reimagining Captain Cook

Reimagining Captain Cook

From Nov 29 2019 to Aug 04 2019

The voyages of Oceanic explorer Captain James Cook, whose legacy is now seen by many as controversial, profoundly and durably marked vast areas of the Pacific. Even today, he remains a larger-than-life figure to whom responsibility for the course of history is assigned, and he retains an almost mythical status in the works of Pacifi c artists. The British Museum is honoring this pivotal figure with a show of artworks from the South Seas on view until August 4, 2019, that reveal how he has been represented. Artists Michel Tuffery, Lisa Reihana, and Steve Gibbs revisit the life and work of this famed captain, who departed the shores of England 250 years ago to sail into the great unknown.

Santa Fe in August

Santa Fe in August

From Aug 08 2019 to Aug 16 2019

One of the tribal art world’s longest- standing events, this year the Whitehawk annual Antique Indian & Ethnographic Art Show celebrates its forty-first continuous year of operation. Held at the Santa Fe Community Convention Center just a few blocks from the Plaza, the event features approximately 100 largely United States–based dealers representing fi elds as diverse as Native American and Pre-Columbian art to high-end Asian, Spanish colonial, and folk art. The event opens with a gala reception on the evening of August 9, 2019, and is open to the public regular hours August 10–12. This is a show that truly has something for everyone. Not far away at El Museo Cultural de Santa Fe, the annual Objects of Art show will be held the same weekend. This is a more broadly focused event than Whitehawk. While there is a strong presence of Native American and ethnographic art at this show, its intended emphasis is art and design, and other dealers include fi ne art, furniture, decorative arts, jewelry, and fashion. More than seventy dealers from the United States and abroad will bring their aesthetic perspectives to the event. The show commences with a cocktail reception on the evening of August 8, which benefits the Santa Fe Museum of International Folk Art, and is open regular hours August 9–11. Portions of the proceeds—those from canine-inspired artworks— will benefit Assistance Dogs of the West in Santa Fe.

Hearts of People: Native Women Artists

Hearts of People: Native Women Artists

From Jun 02 2019 to Aug 18 2019

Women have long been the creative force behind Native American art. Presented in close cooperation with top Native women artists and scholars, Hearts of Our People: Native Women Artists, on view at the Minneapolis Institute of Arts, will be the first major exhibition of artwork by Native women. It will celebrate the achievements of more than 115 artists from the United States and Canada spanning over 1,000 years. Their triumphs—from pottery, textiles, and painting, to photographic portraits, to a gleaming El Camino—reveal astonishing innovation and technical mastery. The show was curated by Jill Ahlberg Yohe and Teri Greeves working in consultation with a Native Exhibition Advisory Board, a panel of twenty-one Native artists and Native and non-Native scholars from across North America, who provided insights from a wide range of nations at every step in the curatorial process. It will be on view June 2–August 18, 2019, and is presented by the Shakopee Mdewakanton Sioux Community.

Remedies at Galerie Afrique

Remedies at Galerie Afrique

From Jul 04 2019 to Aug 31 2019

It’s not summer without an African art exhibition in Ramatuelle, and we have Galerie Afrique to thank for that. Every July, the gallery welcomes the many visitors to this beautiful medieval village on the French Riviera by staging a cultural event commensurate with the beauty of the place. This year, the subject is the art and medicine of West Africa. From July 1–August 31, 2019, the gallery will be filled with symbols of distress, masks with deformed features from the Pende of the Democratic Republic of the Congo for instance, as well as by “remedy objects” such as receptacles for medicinal substances from Tanzania, sculptures associated with the Vodun practices of West Africa, and healing figures from Ghana. While these objects come from many different regions and answer to a wide variety of needs, the gallery’s owners feel they share a commonality in their formal conception with the works of the masters of abstractionism and cubism in twentieth-century Western art.

Grey is the new pink: moments of ageing

Grey is the new pink: moments of ageing

From Oct 25 2018 to Sep 01 2019

How do we deal with the political, social, and scientific problems that the world’s ever-increasing older population gives rise to? How can this inexorable aging process be approached from a multicultural perspective? And how can it be interpreted in an artistic and, most importantly, optimistic perspective? Artists all over the world are exploring the possibilities, each according to their own traditions, points of view, and the cultural baggage they carry. Every culture has its own conceptions of aging and of the stages of life. Will there eventually be a universal notion of “age” and in particular of advanced age? What can we learn from our neighbors about ways to manage our elderly population? These are questions that Grey is the New Pink: Moments of Aging, on view until September 1, 2019, at the Weltkulturen Museum addresses through the presentation of works by more than fifteen multinational artists. It invites reflection upon cultural contradictions and places the museum squarely in the realm of social discourse.

Kini ke Kua: Transformative Images

Kini ke Kua: Transformative Images

From Feb 16 2019 to Sep 02 2019

The Bernice Pauahi Bishop Museum is presenting Kini ke Kua: Transformative Images, an exhibit that explores relationships between ki'i (images) and people. From sculptures to photographs and contemporary renderings, the exhibition presents a multifaceted installation of such images from the Bishop’s collection and contemporary indigenous art and practice. It is on view until Sept. 2, 2019. Ki‘i are a cornerstone of Hawaiian spirituality and can take many forms. Fashioned from wood, stone, and other natural materials, ki‘i become embodiments of deity: representations of akua (gods) and aumākua (personal or family guardians). This exhibit explores some of the ways in which relationships between ki'i and people may change and how and why some of those changes have occurred. At the center of the exhibition is the kii long held in the Vérité Collection, recently gifted to the Bishop Museum by Salesforce Chairman and CEO Marc Benioff and his wife, Lynne.

Color Riot!

Color Riot!

From Jun 15 2019 to Sep 02 2019

PHOENIX—The individualism and fl air for experimentation of Navajo weavers are vividly expressed in textiles from the last quarter of the nineteenth century. These textiles are rooted in ideas and events that the weavers experienced between 1863 and 1868, the hard years of their imprisonment in the Bosque Redondo, and their subsequent return to a reservation. During this time, weavers saw examples of the design systems of Hispanic textiles and acquired new materials such as aniline dyes and Germantown yarns that touched off their experiments with color and design. Commercial products at trading posts sparked additional design ideas for weavers. This was a time when outside market influences were at a low point. The old indigenous trading networks had been disrupted, woven garments were being replaced with commercial cloth, and traders had not yet developed the design constraints dictated by the rug market that developed in the early 1900s. During this time of great change, as the Navajo rebuilt their flocks and repaired the devastation of Bosque Redondo, weavers had an unprecedented freedom to experiment. Today, Navajo textiles are viewed as art, and the visions of these weavers are being showcased in Color Riot! How Color Changed Navajo Textiles at the Heard Museum through September 29, 2019.