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Asen Arts of Dahomey at the Musée Barbier-Mueller

Asen Arts of Dahomey at the Musée Barbier-Mueller

From Nov 21 2018 to May 26 2019

For the Winter coming, the Musée Barbier-Mueller in Geneva will present a special exhibition focused on the West African tradition of iron altars known as asen, specifically those of the former kingdom of Dahomey. Titled Asen: Mémoires forgés à fer dans l’Art Vodun du Dahomey (Asen: Forged Memories of Iron in Dahomey Vodun Art), it will explore an array of issues important to our understanding of these striking sculptures like artist hands, questions of use, the history of these arts which were found in particular in Benin, Nigeria and Togo populations. The various asen motifs referencing the deceased help to recall the memory of these important figures. Transformed through related offerings, they becomes the means for further engagement with these critical ancestors. This collection, representing some of the finest iron sculptures anywhere in Africa—or elsewhere—offers a unique occasion for close looking at these remarkable works.

Engaging African Art: Highlights from the Horn Collection at the Flint Institute of Arts

Engaging African Art: Highlights from the Horn Collection at the Flint Institute of Arts

From Jan 27 2019 to May 26 2019

Dr. Robert Horn began collecting African art more than fifty years ago, and his collection spans more than sixty African cultures, primarily from countries in Western and Central Africa. The collection includes masks as well as small- to medium-sized figures representing various spiritual, social, and ceremonial messages through ritual to status-related objects. Engaging African Art: Highlights from the Horn Collection at the Flint Institute of Arts until May 26, 2019, showcases the quality and diversity of this collection while at the same time demonstrating the rich diversity of African visual expressions and cultures.

Anting-Anting. The Secret Soul of the Filipino

Anting-Anting. The Secret Soul of the Filipino

From Mar 12 2019 to May 26 2019

It's also on March 12 that the exhibition "Anting-Anting. The secret Soul of the Filipino" will open his doors at Musée du Quai Branly Jacques Chirac. The exhibition brings together a selection of Anting-Anting, sources of strength and power and a prominent feature during the Philippine Revolution. Anting-Anting are talismans: medallions in brass, copper, wood or bone, they are natural objects worn close to the body, providing protection for the wearer, making them invincible – particularly to bullet wounds –, and conferring wealth, love, and romance along with mystical power. These objects are the product of a syncretic mix of animist, pre-colonial beliefs, popular Catholicism and cabbalistic and masonic traditions. As sources of strength and power, they were a prominent feature during the Philippine Revolution of 1898, as well as during millenarian and peasant revolts. They are still worn today by police officers, soldiers and members of secret cults as a means of protection. Anting-Anting, as both physical objects and embodying a collective memory, reflect the history and influences that have shaped the Philippines and the Filipino people. On view until Sunday 26 May 2019.

Josef Albers in Mexico

Josef Albers in Mexico

From Feb 01 2019 to May 27 2019

The Heard Museum is presenting Josef Albers in Mexico, an exhibition organized by the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum in New York and curated by Lauren Hinkson. On view until May 27, 2019, the exhibition elucidates the influence and connectivity between the work of Albers (German, 1888–1976) and the abstracted geometric vocabulary of Pre-Columbian art, architecture, and material culture. Albers and his wife, Anni (1899–1994), took frequent trips to Latin America, with particular interest in Mexico—visiting the country more than a dozen times from the 1930s to the 1960s. Albers’ fascination with the visual culture of Mexico left an indelible mark on his own artistic production and methodology, with sites like Teotihuacán, Chichén Itza, Monte Albán, and Mitla infiltrating the visual framework of his work. Included in the exhibition are rarely seen early paintings by Albers, seminal works like Homage to the Square and Variant/Adobe series, works on paper, and a selection of rich photographic and photocollage work, many of which have never before been on public view.

Contemporary African artistic creation is invited to the Grand Palais.

Contemporary African artistic creation is invited to the Grand Palais.

From May 23 2019 to May 27 2019

From May 23 to 26, 2019, crafts and contemporary creation meet for R4, the fourth edition of revelations. Unique and daring pieces from around 450 creators, artists of the material, manufactures, and especially of contemporary African artists emerging or to follow. Cameroon brings the vital and creative forces of its crafts and especially those of the Bamileke country, South Africa, plural, embody its authenticity and openness to the world. The Bayakha Exceptional Designer Collective, Bayakha "we manufacture" in Zulu reinvents traditional knowledge based on local raw materials, such as Karoo wool, Kwazulu palm. An exceptional and unprecedented time of exchange around the issues of transmission of know-how in Africa, but also the accompaniment and economic development of African art workshops will be held on May 24th. Friday, May 24 from 10 to 11 am a conference will be held around the theme: What are the challenges of transmitting heritage and knowledge in Africa? Roxana Aximi - journalist, Aissa Dione - textile designer, Senegal, Ngoné Fall - curator general of the 2020 African season, France and Barthélémy Toguo - visual artist will be present.

Bourgogne Tribal Show 2019

Bourgogne Tribal Show 2019

From May 30 2019 to Jun 02 2019

When the good weather finally arrives, it’s time to get outdoors again, and the desire to get out of the city for a while can become an obsession. The organizers of the Bourgogne Tribal Show clearly understand this, and for three years now they’ve made the dream come true for a remarkable number of tribal art aficionados by producing an important show in an ultra-relaxed, bucolic setting punctuated by mooing cows. The event has taken root in its country setting and it enters its fourth year May 30–June 2, 2019, once again on Bruno Mory’s property near Cluny. More than twenty dealers have already confirmed that they will participate, and a new temporary exhibition, this time organized by artist Coco Fronsac, will again be presented at the Abbaye de Cluny. The heart of the fair continues to beat to the rhythms of tribal art, but diversification is also in the offing, since the event this year will include, among others, Galerie Sismann, which specializes in medieval art; Laura Bosc de Ganay and Jean-David Cahn for archaeological art; Max Rutherston for Japanese art; and Alexis Renard for Indian art.

"In a Different Light" at the Museum of Anthropology at the UBC

From Jun 22 2017 to Jun 03 2019

This inaugural exhibition marks the opening of a new gallery dedicated to American Indian and Northwest Coast Indian arts at the Museum of Anthropology at the University of British Columbia, in Vancouver. More than 110 historically significant and unusually fine artworks are presented in a new way. "In a Different Light: Reflecting on Northwest Coast Art" also marks the return of a number of objects to British Columbia which passed from museums into private collections and away from their communities in the nineteenth century. A goal of the exhibition is to restore their history through the knowledge of artists and First Nation members, as well as to enable these people to reconnect with their origins. Transcending notions of art and craftsmanship, these objects offer precious insight into the connections between Native Americans and their lands. The exhibition sheds light on this culture’s perception of the world, as well as upon the creativity and inventiveness that their works display.

Binoche & Giquello : American Collection of Pre-Columbian Art

Binoche & Giquello : American Collection of Pre-Columbian Art

From Jun 05 2019 to Jun 06 2019

On June 6, the auction house Binoche and Giquello will auction a large collection of American Pre-Columbian Art. This exceptional collection of remarkable quality brings objects from South America, Central America and Mesopotamia. Masterpieces of prestigious provenance, some of which were loaned to major museums for famous exhibitions, among them the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Brooklyn Museum of Art. These sublime works, witnesses of the past, besides the strength to have survived, have that of being timeless. Through their lines, their pure curves they are incredibly and undeniably contemporary. Among them, a superb anthropo-zoomorphic gray stele, from the Valdivia South culture of the equator (3200-1500 BC) (Lot 6), presenting a clever game of reliefs and geometries of forms, engraved, carved and decorated which enliven the stele of vitality, its features thus revealed. From the Mochica culture, a funerary mask from Northern Peru (Lot 14), and a very rare and impressi Mochia funeral mask made of wood enhanced with red pigments, as impressive as it is impressive (Lot 15), (sold at Sotheby's in 1992 November 23 lot 12). From the Olmec culture: a sublime anthropomorphous mask Las Lagunas, xochipala, State of Guerrero, Mexico (Lot 28). A standing figure from the Puebla region (Lot 31), animated with incredible and strong presence. The legs and the arms are gone. The movement of the bust, of the slightly retracted ribcage gives it an inspiration, a vitality, the pectorals and clavicles in slight relief accentuate both the movement and the expressiveness of the face forward. The eyes emptied, are highlighted by the eyelids finely incised. The lips projecting makes a pout which confers its originality. The character seems to observe, carefully. A work of masterful technical prowess with expressive features. Preview: Wednesday 5th June from 11am to 6pm and Thursday 6 June from 11am to 2pm. Sale on June 6 at 4pm.

The musée Royal de l'Afrique Centrale in Tervuren Reopen !

The musée Royal de l'Afrique Centrale in Tervuren Reopen !

From Dec 08 2018 to Jun 08 2019

On December 9, the Musée Royal de l’Afrique Centrale in Tervuren, Belgium, will reopen after having been closed for fi ve years for renovation. Still in its original building, the museum now boasts more than 100,000 square feet of gallery space for its masterpieces of African art. Moving forward, it will present a dialog between living African artists and iconic masterpieces of the past. The annual special issue of Tribal Art magazine is dedicated to this milestone event. You can have a first look at it by browsing the following link : http://www.tribalartmagazine.com/issue-666608-sample-2. Or Receive FREE of charge our Special Issue no. 8 "An Unrivalled Museum" by subscribing to Tribal Art magazine.

Art of Suriname in Zurich

Art of Suriname in Zurich

From Jul 01 2018 to Jun 16 2019

Heinrich Harrer is mainly known for his mountain-climbing skills, but he was passionate about travel in general and visited New Guinea, Brazil, Suriname, and Asia. He was a collector as well as an explorer, and he amassed nearly 1,500 diverse objects that are lively testimonies to the lifeways of the people as well as to the life of the man who acquired them. Harrer was meticulous and each of his pieces was documented, photographed, recorded in a journal, and sometimes even appeared in a short fi lm. The Völkerkundemuseum of the Universität Zürich, which now holds Harrer’s collection, is showing works from Suriname that he acquired in 1966 in Saamaka, then an isolated and remote part of country. They cast light on the daily lives of the people that created them as well as on the fascinating history of the region.